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Tuesday, March 10, 2009

strict limitations

my weekly book purchases

This week, I was a good girl, and I only bought two books. One full-priced, one dollar book. I am proud of myself. These are economically trying times! Here we go...

Apollonio, Umbro. MIRO. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1969. [paperback]

I have a Grosset & Dunlap Degas book that I've frequently used to collage by cutting out the pretty color pictures. These little volumes are so good because they have a short amount of text in the front, explanations of each of the art pieces featured in the book and then color plates of the artist's work that takes up most of the book. I liked this one because Miro is sort of all over the place, he starts out fairly impressionistic and then gets into that weird stuff (that apparently is based on real life things that make sense, so someone told me) that looks like lines and symbols and lots of precise colors. Towards the end of the plate collection, there's some sculpture of his as well. My favorite thing in the whole book is pg. 62-63, "Night" 1957, which is a beautigul and simple painting on ceramic tiles. The tiles are all different shades of brown. It's pretty spectacular. Some of these will probably be pulled out and pasted to envelopes, or mounted on my wall soon.

Nabokov, Vladimir. Speak, Memory. New York: Putnam, 1966. [hardcover]

Buying this, I disobeyed one of my rules: never buy a book we have more than one copy of on the shelves. However, I will justify my purchase by saying it's difficult to get ahold of an older, hardcover copy of this memoir, perhaps the only good memoir ever written (okay, please disagree with me here, vehemently,) that has a decent dust jacket. One came into the store once, and I should have grabbed it then-- it was mylared and everything (sigh.), but someone else bought it. So, this time, though my copy has no mylar, the dust jacket is perfect (PERFECT). So I bought it. I've read the first few pages of this sitting on the floor at work more than once, and it's just brilliant. Nabokov is brilliant. I cannot wait to read this book.


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